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A Classic(al) Monster – 13:15-13:54 Thursday 31st July Leeds City Museum

Poster for talk

My poster for my talk on Hannibal Lecter

Eleanor OKell’s talk focuses on the role of the classics and classical myth in Thomas Harris’ construction of a “monster” who has become one of popular fiction’s best-loved serial killers – Hannibal Lecter. The talk explores the classical references and backgrounds evoked by Harris and examines their purpose in terms of the audience’s understanding of the characters involved.

 

 

Commemorating Augustus Conference Recordings

We are happy to announce that audio (and some video) recordings of papers from the Commemorating Augustus conference will be accessible on a secure page on this site so that speakers and delegates at the conference will have the opportunity to listen to all the papers, even those in parallel sessions. In addition, those who are not able to attend the conference in person can register as virtual delegates and enjoy the papers remotely.

Commemorating Augustus conference logo (banner)

Recordings will be posted online after the conference and will not include the following Q&A session.

Access to the secure page will be possible only by password made available by email to registered delegates and virtual delegates. Information about registering as a Virtual Delegate (£40) is available from the conference website and online store.

Samples of relevant recordings and supporting materials on this site, which are indicative of what will be available in the secure area, are Penny Goodman’s reflections on the current level of recognition Augustus enjoys in “2000 years of Augustus: the view from Leeds” and “2000 years of Augustus: the world view” (both 20 minutes streamed mp3 with downloadable pdfs of PowerPoint slides/handout).

 

OUP logoYou might like to take a look recent publications relating to Augustus from Oxford University Press. Click on the logo to go directly to the online catalogue.

2000 years of Augustus: the world view – uploaded

My poster for Penny's talk with images of the Prima Porta Augustus, including the original, a recoloured cast and a modern caricature.

My poster for Penny’s talk with images of the Prima Porta Augustus, including the original, a recoloured cast and a modern caricature.

This month’s Classics in our Lunchtimes talk was delivered by Dr Penny Goodman, leader of the Commemorating Augustus project, which explores the “afterlife” of Augustus and perceptions of him during the 2,000 years since his death on 19th August AD14. Having previously presented a snapshot of Leeds’ views on Augustus for this series to great interest, this time she presented a broader survey of activities around the world during 2014 that commemorate Augustus.

Opening with a consideration of Roman and modern concepts of anniversaries and commemorations, this excellent talk focused in on two commemorative events, a festival in Tarragona in Spain and the renovation of the Mausoloeum of Augustus and the surrounding area in Rome (last renovated by Mussolini for his commemoration of 2,000 years since Augustus’ birth in 1938). The content and motivation for two events strongly suggest that Augustus is not just part of European/Western cultural/historical identity but that he has particular local significance and that such relationships are forged anew in “marker” years. 

Listen to the talk (30 mins)

Download the slides (pdf: 3,189KB)

Penny is also organising a major international conference with speakers (including classicists, art historians and arichtects) who will explore Augustus and Augustus’ legacy in a variety of contexts, genres and historical periods, including the Renaissance, Second World War and modern TV, among others. The conference is to be held at Devonshire Hall, Leeds, on 18th-20th August 2014 and is open to all (subject to payment of the conference fee). The conference papers will be recorded and made available as streamed audio files together with handouts and slideshows for virtual delegates (fee £40).  For further details of the conference, including fees and the full programme, please see the Conference Website.

 

2000 years of Augustus – 13:15-13:45 Thursday 26th June, Leeds City Museum

My poster for Penny's talk with images of the Prima Porta Augustus, including the original, a recoloured cast and a modern caricature.

My poster for Penny’s talk with images of the Prima Porta Augustus, including the original, a recoloured cast and a modern caricature.

This month’s Classics in our Lunchtimes talk is delivered by Dr Penny Goodman, leader of the Commemorating Augustus project, which explores the “afterlife” of Augustus and perceptions of him during the 2,000 years since his death on 19th August AD14. Having previously presented a snapshot of Leeds’ views on Augustus for this series to great interest, this time she has agreed to present a broader survey with a talk focusing on the world view.

Penny is also organising a major international conference with speakers (including classicists, art historians and arichtects) on the reception of Augustus and Augustus’ legacy in a variety of contexts, genres and historical periods, including the Renaissance, Second World War and modern TV, among others. The conference is to be held at Devonshire Hall, Leeds, on 18th-20th August 2014 and is open to all (subject to payment of the conference fee). The conference papers will be recorded and made available as streamed audio files together with handouts and slideshows for virtual delegates (fee £40).  For further details of the conference, including fees and the full programme, please see the Conference Website.

 

Pre-performance talks – 19:00 8th-10th May 2014

Experts in Greek drama from Classics at the University of Leeds discuss Euripides’ Bacchae – it’s text and original context – in relation to the modern, updated, performance of Euripides’ taking place at 19:30 8th-10th May. The talks will provide background information and highlight specific points of interest, thereby adding to appreciation of the performance.

Thursday 8th May – Dr Edmund Stewart

Friday 9th May – Dr Eleanor OKell

Saturday 20th May – Professor Malcolm Heath

Pre-performance talks will start no later than 19:05 and conclude by 19:20, allowing audience members time to take their seats and enjoy the performance at 19:30. Directions to the pre-performance talk’s venue will be provided from the stage@leeds foyer on the day. Please arrive in the stage@leeds foyer by by 18:55.

The talks are open to all, but if seats become limited preference will be given to ticket holders.

Details of the performance of Euripides’ Bacchae – including a link through which to purchase tickets – are available here.

For more from these speakers – and Dr Emma Stafford – on Euripides’ Bacchae, see this set of teachers’ resources.

Ancient Epic Fights Back: George Lucas as rhapsode – 29th May 2014

Poster with images of a rhapsode (red-figure bottom left), a Homeric duel (black-figure, top left), a duel from Star Wars (top right) and George Lucas with characters from his works (bottom right)

My poster for Bev’s talk: the rhapsode appears bootom left

13:15-13:45 Thursday 29th May 2014, Leeds City Museum

Bev Scott examines George Lucas’ epic story-telling techniques and relates them to those of the singers of ancient epic poetry. This exploration of the roots of story-telling on a grand scale and their application in a modern context will illuminate our unconscious expectations about how stories are told and what makes a sci-fi film into an epic.

The precise room will be confirmed on the day, look out for the posters or ask at the front door.

In the shadow of Samothrace: the New Trojan War 1915 – 18:00-18:30 9th April Centenary Gallery University of Leeds

My poster for Professor Lieu's public talk.

My poster for Professor Lieu’s public talk.

Classics Talks is delighted to announce a preview of the content of a soon-to-be-published book.  Professor Samuel N. C. Lieu (Inaugural Distinguished Professor of Ancient History, Macquarie University, Sydney,  Fellow of the Australian Academy (Humanities), currently Visiting Fellow at Wolfson College, Cambridge) has kindly agreed to record his public lecture, which is one of the public events centred around the international conference Classics and Classicists in WWI. His illustrated talk on Australians’ use of classics to understand events and experiences in WWI will be available on this site, but anyone who is able to attend in person is most welcome.

The battle landscapes of Gallipoli and the Dardanelles campaign in WWI overlay those of ancient Troy, as memorialised in Homer’s Iliad. Prof. Lieu will show how soldiers reflected on those mythological resonances and how classical themes were absorbed into the memorials of ANZAC (Gallipoli) Day as a new Australian myth of foundation and identity.

The Centenary Gallery is on the Parkinson Court level of the Parkinson Building, University of Leeds. Wheelchair access is currently through Chemistry due to building work.

Image of a soldier with an infant wearing his hat from the November 1918 issue of Ladies Home Journal.

My publicity for the performed extracts from Trojan Women (twenty minutes in total comprising a number of encounters between actors and audience within the exhibition space. Image of a soldier with an infant wearing his hat from the November 1918 issue of Ladies Home Journal.

Other public events include performance of extracts from Gilbert Murray’s 1905 English-rhyming-verse translation of Euripides’ Trojan Women – the world’s greatest antiwar play (according to Eleanor OKell, 2012) or “the world’s greatest peace play” (according to the Women’s Peace Party, 1915) – 17:00-19:00 9th April 2014 and a number of exhibitions. Exhibitions in Parkinson Court focus on experiences of WWI in the north of England, including the Scarborough, Hartlepool, West Hartlepool and Whitby bombardment of 16th December 1915. An exhibition in Special Collections presents “Songs of Troy” exploring links between the 2nd Trojan War (as narrated by Homer in the Iliad) and WWI made by soldier-poets, Americans responding to Murray’s translation, Margaret Storm Jameson and Simon Armitage. A further exhibition on clasicists’ contribution to the war effort is open only to conference delegates but the materials will be made available through talks and online in the near/mid-term future.

Visualising Ancient Drama – 13:15-13:45 24th April Leeds City Museum

 

A poster with images of modern performances in ancient theatres and of modern actors costumed as characters from ancient drama

My poster for Edmund’s talk.

Edmund Stewart, expert in the early reperformance of Greek drama, discusses the feats of imagination necessary for ancient and modern dramaturgs and audiences to visualise Greek drama, both on the stage and in the mind’s eye.

The precise venue will be sign-posted on the day, or please ask Museum staff at the entrance.

Roman Eagles – 27th March 13:15-13:45 Leeds City Museum

My poster for Ben's talk.

My poster for Ben’s talk.

In his talk “Roman Eagles, On-screen Flights of Fancy” Ben Greet, doctoral candidate in Classics, Leeds University, explores the presence of the Roman legionary standard on the large and small screen and its relationship to the reality behind it. The talk brings Roman miltary and cultural expertise together with semiotic, spatial and cinematographic criticism. The talk will consider several versions of Spartacus and Legions of the Eagle among others…

Please check for the venue on arrival at the Museum.

Bacchae Teachers’ Resource Pack

This password protected webpage (Password: George2014) houses the resources created by classicists to introduce performing arts students on a module that takes a Greek tragedy from the page to the modern stage for performance in Leeds in May 2014. It will be useful to students or teachers of any subject at any level who are interested in Euripides’ Bacchae as a performance that originated in C5th BC Athens.

The resources consist of audio-recorded presentations, with accompanying PowerPoint slides and handouts where applicable, which provide some specific bibliography for follow-up, if desired.

Talks are currently being added as they are delivered to students (during February 2014). These will be edited into a resource pack over the next few weeks. Talks will focus on:

  • Myth
  • Religion
  • Historical theatrical context
  • Pentheus’ character

Contact email addresses are provided, if you have any further queries.

We’d appreciate knowing how you used our materials, so please take a moment to tick a box on the survey at the bottom of the webpage when you have finished.

Many thanks,

Eleanor

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