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Greek and Roman Worlds in Star Trek – 13:15-13:45 Thursday 30th October, Leeds City Museum

Poster with images from original Star Trek episodes featuring Greek and Roman worlds

My poster for Ben’s talk.

Ben Greet (PhD student, topic: Roman Eagles), considers how the universe of Star Trek depicts close encounters with the classical world, bringing it out of books (whether of history or mythology) and to life for a mass audience on the small screen.

Focusing on two episodes from season 2 (1970) of the original Star Trek (“Who Mourns for Adonais”, episode 2, and “Bread and Circuses”, episode 25) that introduce Greek gods and the Roman Empire respectively, Ben’s talk will explore their “authenticity” and significance from a number of different perspectives.

The success of these episodes with audiences and the attraction of the frontier of the classical is apparent from episodes from season 3, which add philosophical (“Is there in truth no beauty” and “Plato’s Stepchildren”) and epic literary (“Elaan of Troyas”) episodes to season 2’s mythological and historical encounters.

Protected: Talks on Classical Reception

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In the shadow of Samothrace: the New Trojan War 1915 – uploaded

My poster for Professor Lieu's public talk.

My poster for Professor Lieu’s public talk.

Classics Talks is delighted to announce a preview of the content of a soon-to-be-published book.  Professor Samuel N. C. Lieu (Inaugural Distinguished Professor of Ancient History, Macquarie University, Sydney,  Fellow of the Australian Academy (Humanities), currently Visiting Fellow at Wolfson College, Cambridge) kindly agreed to record his public lecture on Australians’ use of classics to understand events and experiences in WWI from the international conference Classics and Classicists in WWI.

The battle landscapes of Gallipoli and the Dardanelles campaign in WWI overlay those of ancient Troy, as memorialised in Homer’s Iliad. Prof. Lieu shows how soldiers reflected on those mythological resonances and how classical themes were absorbed into the memorials of ANZAC (Gallipoli) Day as a new Australian myth of foundation and identity.

Professor Lieu’s slides are not available due to copyright restrictions.

Bewitching? – now uploaded

My poster for Regine's talk.

My poster for Regine’s talk.

The last talk of the 22013-14 academic year was by Regine May, expert on the ancient Latin novel, who explored the influence of Apuleius’ witch Meroe by tracking down her reincarnations in English literature. Meroe was revealed as a reference point and quintessential “witch for all ages”, with adjustments to her characterisation revealing contemporary popular responses to witchcraft in different periods – including our own.

For Meroe from Apuleius to Witchfinder’s manuals, Tudor drama and C21st novels:

Slides for Meroe the Witch (pdf)

If you are interested in ancient novels, their plots and characters, you may wish to consider coming to “Choose Your Own Classical Adventure” in Leeds City Museum on Friday 3rd October where Regine will be appearing as the goddess Isis…

Bewitching? – 13:15-13:45, Thursday 25th September

My poster for Regine's talk.

My poster for Regine’s talk.

The last talk of the 22013-14 academic year will be by Regine May, expert on the ancient Latin novel. In today’s talk she will explore the appeal of Apuleius’ witch Meroe by tracking down her reincarnations in English literature.

If you are interested in ancient novels, their plots and characters, you may wish to consider coming to “Choose Your Own Classical Adventure” in Leeds City Museum on Friday 3rd October where Regine will be appearing as the goddess Isis…

Plato and Iris Murdoch – uploaded

 

Poster with images of Iris Murdoch, Plato and some of Iris' book jackets by Tom Phillips.

My poster for Owen’s talk, with images of some of Iris Murdoch’s book jackets by Tom Phillips.

This talk was given by Owen Hodkinson, expert in epistolary literature and the ancient novel and author of the forthcoming book Metafiction: The Origins of Self-Conscious Fiction in Classical Literature (Routledge 2015). Owen explored the cross-over between Iris Murdoch’s philosophical and fictional writings with particular attention to the influence of Plato in her extensive presentation of the inadequacy of the written word to capture and communicate truth. Owen’s work in the Iris Murdoch archive yielded some fascinating insights into her working process when engaging with Platonic texts.

Listen

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Roman Eagles uploaded

My poster for Ben's talk.

My poster for Ben’s talk.

In his talk “Roman Eagles, On-screen Flights of Fancy” Ben Greet, doctoral candidate in Classics, Leeds University, explored the presence of the Roman legionary standard on the large and small screen, modern expectations of this symbol and its relationship to the reality of the Roman legionary standard as well as the difficulty of establishing what that might be. The talk provided a fascinating exploration of the multiple meanings of military standards more generally: from practical markers and rallying points, to focuses of worship, divine powers, totems and ‘family’ identifiers…

 

Handout (pdf download – 213kB)

Listen

 

Plato and Iris Murdoch – 13:15-13:45 28th August 2014 Leeds City Museum

Poster with images of Iris Murdoch, Plato and some of Iris' book jackets by Tom Phillips.

My poster for Owen’s talk, with images of some of Iris Murdoch’s book jackets by Tom Phillips.

This month’s talk is given by Owen Hodkinson, expert in epistolary literature and the ancient novel and author of the forthcoming book Metafiction: The Origins of Self-Conscious Fiction in Classical Literature (Routledge 2015). Owen will explore the use Iris Murdoch made of her familiarity, as a philosopher, with the letters written by or attributed to Plato when it came to writing both her own philosophy books and novels.

A Classic(al) Monster – 13:15-13:54 Thursday 31st July Leeds City Museum

Poster for talk

My poster for my talk on Hannibal Lecter

Eleanor OKell’s talk focuses on the role of the classics and classical myth in Thomas Harris’ construction of a “monster” who has become one of popular fiction’s best-loved serial killers – Hannibal Lecter. The talk explores the classical references and backgrounds evoked by Harris and examines their purpose in terms of the audience’s understanding of the characters involved.

 

 

Commemorating Augustus Conference Recordings

We are happy to announce that audio (and some video) recordings of papers from the Commemorating Augustus conference will be accessible on a secure page on this site so that speakers and delegates at the conference will have the opportunity to listen to all the papers, even those in parallel sessions. In addition, those who are not able to attend the conference in person can register as virtual delegates and enjoy the papers remotely.

Commemorating Augustus conference logo (banner)

Recordings will be posted online after the conference and will not include the following Q&A session.

Access to the secure page will be possible only by password made available by email to registered delegates and virtual delegates. Information about registering as a Virtual Delegate (£40) is available from the conference website and online store.

Samples of relevant recordings and supporting materials on this site, which are indicative of what will be available in the secure area, are Penny Goodman’s reflections on the current level of recognition Augustus enjoys in “2000 years of Augustus: the view from Leeds” and “2000 years of Augustus: the world view” (both 20 minutes streamed mp3 with downloadable pdfs of PowerPoint slides/handout).

 

OUP logoYou might like to take a look recent publications relating to Augustus from Oxford University Press. Click on the logo to go directly to the online catalogue.

 

 

CambridgeJournalsYou might also like to read some journal articles relating to Augustus. In honour of the bimillenium articles from The Journal of Roman Studies, BritanniaPapers of the British School at RomeThe Classical Quarterly, The Classical ReviewGreece & Rome, The Cambridge Classical Journal, Anatolian Studies, The Journal of Hellenic Studies, Annual of the British School at Athens and Ramus are available as open access until 31st December 2014. Click on the logo to go directly to the homepage.

CUP logoYou might even want to take advantage of the 20% discount on CUP publications that is on  offer to all conference delegates! (Link to be sent with the Login to Virtual Delegates.)

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